Digital Production: developing, implementing and evaluating your digital project

Workshop
Lynda Kelly, Australian National Maritime Museum, Australia

We live in a digital, mobile and connected world. Our visitors, staff and stakeholders are part of ‘Generation C’, citizens who are in control of their own experiences; choose what they will pay attention to, as well as when and how; seek challenges; work and learn collaboratively; and are widely connected, operating under the ethos of ‘I share, therefore I am’. The next generation has been called the ‘post-Google generation’ – children who will never have known a world without being connected to an electronic device and, most commonly, one that is mobile. Across all generations, participation is not only embraced, it is expected – 24/7 (Kelly, 2013).

According to Johnson, et al, 2011, museum visitors and staff increasingly expect a seamless experience across devices, with the reality that digitisation and cataloguing projects continue to require a significant share of museum resources.

Given these challenges and restrictions what are the best ways to develop, implement and evaluate a digital project? Using a series of case studies coupled with considerable experience in this area I will take participants through a practical, hands-on, how-to session to ensure that their digital project has the best chance of success.

Participants will also have the opportunity to plan a digital project for their own institution, and should bring along ideas, plans, prototypes etc for use in the workshop.

Bibliography:
We live in a digital, mobile and connected world. Our visitors, staff and stakeholders are part of ‘Generation C’, citizens who are in control of their own experiences; choose what they will pay attention to, as well as when and how; seek challenges; work and learn collaboratively; and are widely connected, operating under the ethos of ‘I share, therefore I am’. The next generation has been called the ‘post-Google generation’ – children who will never have known a world without being connected to an electronic device and, most commonly, one that is mobile. Across all generations, participation is not only embraced, it is expected – 24/7 (Kelly, 2013). According to Johnson, et al, 2011, museum visitors and staff increasingly expect a seamless experience across devices, with the reality that digitisation and cataloguing projects continue to require a significant share of museum resources. Given these challenges and restrictions what are the best ways to develop, implement and evaluate a digital project? Using a series of case studies coupled with considerable experience in this area I will take participants through a practical, hands-on, how-to session to ensure that their digital project has the best chance of success. Participants will also have the opportunity to plan a digital project for their own institution, and should bring along ideas, plans, prototypes etc for use in the workshop.