Object-oriented digital strategy: brainstorming ways to make strategy more efficient and responsive

Lightning Talk
Charles Zange, The George Washington University, USA

In an object-oriented language like Java, programmers rarely reevaluate every portion of code to make improvements. Instead, they break programs into classes and address each separately as needed. The software acts as an environment in which multiple components generate independent outcomes networked along a common goal. Agile development makes the program into a responsive platform and a continuous work in progress. Can digital strategy work the same way? Is modularization a helpful concept in strategy planning? How would museums choose where to generate ‘classes,’ and how would they keep these separations organized? What principles of design could be used to create digital strategies that can last and change? This lightning talk will take a humble approach in looking at digital strategies at four different institutions to analyze structure, implementation, and changeability. It will evaluate from the outside and the inside using independent research. The goal of this presentation is to jump-start a conversation about designing digital strategies that are adaptable, actionable, and lasting.

Bibliography:
In an object-oriented language like Java, programmers rarely reevaluate every portion of code to make improvements. Instead, they break programs into classes and address each separately as needed. The software acts as an environment in which multiple components generate independent outcomes networked along a common goal. Agile development makes the program into a responsive platform and a continuous work in progress. Can digital strategy work the same way? Is modularization a helpful concept in strategy planning? How would museums choose where to generate ‘classes,’ and how would they keep these separations organized? What principles of design could be used to create digital strategies that can last and change? This lightning talk will take a humble approach in looking at digital strategies at four different institutions to analyze structure, implementation, and changeability. It will evaluate from the outside and the inside using independent research. The goal of this presentation is to jump-start a conversation about designing digital strategies that are adaptable, actionable, and lasting.